In the media: Dr Sharp featured in breast lift guide

  Breast lift (or mastopexy) surgery can be confusing: it’s often mistaken for breast reduction surgery and it’s sometimes recommended alongside a breast augmentation to ensure optimal results. What makes you a candidate for breast lift surgery instead of breast reduction, and in what circumstances should you consider a mastopexy with your augmentation? Style Magazines’ recent breast lift feature addressed some of the misconceptions about mastopexy surgery, answering some commonly asked questions about this transformative procedure. Journalist Siobhan Taylor spoke to Dr Sharp about the surgical process - as well as the risks, recovery and what makes someone an ideal candidate for breast lift surgery: While the breast lift (or ‘mastopexy’ as your doctor would say) sounds simple enough, there’s a lot going on under the surface that you may not be aware of. In fact, the details of the surgery are significantly different from that of a standard boob job altering everything from your initial consultation right through to the end results. Because we want everyone to have the tools to make an informed decision, we decided to speak with Dr David Sharp, a highly-regarded Brisbane-based FRACS credentialed plastic surgeon, to learn more about breast lifts. Assisted by a team of clinical and administrative professionals, Dr Sharp is highly sought after for his expertise and down-to-earth approach. We asked him six of the most common questions our readers have about breast lifts. Read the full article here! Is breast lift surgery right for you? Get in touch with our patient care team and find out more... Name Email Address Contact number I'd like to know more about... 10...

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge 2017 Highlights

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge Aesthetic Surgery Symposium has been running for 37 years and brings together some of the world’s leading aesthetic plastic surgeons. This year, Dr Sharp and practice director Liz Washington joined hundreds of plastic surgeons and their clinic teams to learn more about the innovative techniques for facial and body rejuvenation. The program featured 94 instructive surgical videos, 26 presentations, 13 expert panels and 8 debates. Dr Sharp loves being abreast of the latest advancements in plastic and cosmetic surgery, and these forums provide a valuable opportunity to hear about the techniques, trials, anecdotal experiences and standards from across the world. The overall message from the symposium was: aesthetic surgery has changed, and the over-stretched, over-enhanced, over-done look is a thing of the past. Progressive surgeons are working together to develop new techniques to approach cosmetic surgery to achieve a more balanced, proportionate and natural look than ever before. We thought some of our patients may be curious to hear more about the ideas discussed, so in these videos, Liz briefly covers some of the symposium topics that often arise in our discussions with patients. Fat grafting Fat grafting has been used for reconstructive purposes for many decades, but its use for rejuvenation and enhancement is still a relatively new concept, and something that surgeons are still experimenting with to perfect and hone the right technique for different areas of the body. We saw some exciting results from the panel, and of particular interest was ‘micro’ and ‘nano’ fat grafting for facial rejuvenation, which is providing not just volume replacement, but also dermal rejuvenation. The faculty also addressed the...

Post pregnancy tummy tuck: what you need to know

Pregnancy stretches the abdominal muscles and skin, often leaving a pouch like appearance where the muscle are permanently separated, lax and weakened. This is called rectus divarication and it can lead to secondary problems such as hernias, difficulty exercising, pelvic floor problems, incontinence, skin infections, core strength deficits and back pain. A reconstructive abdominoplasty resolves this by rejoining the separated muscles, repairing hernias and removing loose skin. Far from being only a cosmetic procedure, it can have a significant impact on a woman’s core strength, continence and self esteem after having babies. During this procedure, permanent stitches are used to pull the abdominal muscles together, restoring midsection support and creating a firmer abdomen. Sometimes the laxity of the lateral abdominal muscles (obliques) also requires permanent sutures to create an ideal shape; this is called muscle plication. Up until 2016, the Medical Benefits Scheme included post partum abdominoplasty, offering a rebate on the procedure where it was deemed medically necessary. However, after 45 years of being allocated an item number, the procedure was removed from the scheme in December 2015, meaning the 6,000 women who require this surgery each year would have to pay around $10,000 to have it performed. As reported in The Australian, the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) requested recommended against the removal, amid concerns over the life long repercussions women may experience if abdominal function is not restored. Currently, women requiring reconstructive abdominoplasty must access this surgery through a private plastic surgeon. The cost varies depending on the surgeon, anaesthetist, hospital facility and length of inpatient stay, but generally ranges from $9,000 to $12,000. Patients who require a post...

Mums lead the way in cosmetic surgery

  Reported by Anna Hartley | 6th April | Queensland Times: SOME might be quick to assume young women would make up most cosmetic surgery candidates. According to Ipswich plastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr David Sharp, the majority of people who come to him for plastic surgery are in fact women in their 40s and 50s. The surgeon said the most common cosmetic procedures he performed were tummy tucks, breast reduction and augmentation surgery. “There is a large group of patients who have thought about having cosmetic surgery for years, usually females in their 40s or 50s who’ve had their children, who say, ‘I want to do something for myself now’.,” Dr Sharp said. “After skin cancer there is a lot of cosmetic stuff coming through and of that it’s mainly abdominoplasty, breast reductions, and breast augmentation.” Dr Sharp said his biggest concern when it came to cosmetic surgery was the trend of people choosing the “cheap” option. “The only people who are qualified to call themselves surgeons in Australia have to have a fellowship with the Royal Australian College of Surgeons,” he said. “My advice would be for cosmetic surgery candidates to really do their research. “I’ve heard some horror stories. The cheapest option is not necessarily the best.” Read the full article at The Queensland Times.  ...