Question of the week: using liposuctioned fat for grafting

I want to have fat liposuctioned out of my thighs and stomach, and put into my breasts and face to fill out my sagging skin. Is it possible to do this instead of having a breast augmentation and facelift? - patient Dr Sharp: Patients also often ask if liposuctioned fat can be injected into other parts of the body, or ‘fat grafted’. The best way to explain my approach to liposuction and fat grafting is that liposuction is all about volume of fat, where as fat grafting is all about quality of fat! I often take small amounts of fat from the stomach or thighs and place these in the face to fill out areas that have experienced volume loss. Likewise, for slim women who lack fat across their chest to soften the appearance of their breast implants, I often graft small amounts of fat around the periphery of implants, to create a more natural look and reduce the visibility of implant rippling. Unfortunately it’s not an easy case of liposuctioning large amounts of stomach fat and using it to build breasts that are two cup sizes bigger. This is because liposuction technology aims to remove the maximum amount of fat with the least amount of physical damage to surrounding tissues. And the best way to do that is to break down the fat as much as possible before extracting it. This damages the fat cells and inhibits their ability to regrow when transplanted into another area; so it’s not considered to be ‘good quality’ harvested fat. One of the biggest downfalls of fat grafting is the fact that some...

Question of the week: facelift scars

Where are facelift scars located, and can they be positioned so that they are invisible to the eye? - patient Dr Sharp: I customise each facelift procedure to the individual patient’s anatomy and their age, degree of skin laxity and hair line. Most standard facelifts usually involve an incision inside the hairline adjacent to the temple, down the earlobe and around the back of the ear, tracking along the hairline down to the nape of the neck (as shown below by the dotted line). Sometimes the incision is shorter, especially in my shorter-scar Sharp Lift procedure, more common among people in their late 30’s and 40’s who want to redefine their jawline and remove early jowls. Wherever possible, incisions are placed within the hair or along the hairline, although this can be dependent upon the thickness of the hair, the position of the hairline (some people have receding hairlines, while others sit forward on the face) and how much skin is removed. How you scar is largely dependent upon your body’s natural predispositions; your ethnicity and genetics play a role in scar colour and texture. Due to neck movement and the pressure on incisions when lying down or turning your head, sometimes the scars behind the ears and along the hairline of the neck can be thicker and wider for the first 24 months, but once you reach the 2 year mark post operatively, most patients find their scars no longer look or feel prominent. We understand that scars are one of the most common aspects of facelift surgery that deter people from undergoing the procedure. It’s one of the first...

What is lip lift surgery?

Kylie Jenner recently kissed goodbye to the over-inflated lip look that once made her famous, opting for a more subtle pout. The key to beauty is proportion, and rather than looking naturally hydrated and full-lipped, those who emulated her style often looked as though they were suffering from anaphylaxis. So what’s the next ‘big thing’ in lips? If demand in our Brisbane and Ipswich clinics is any indication, ‘lip lift’ surgery is growing in popularity among women who want to make changes to their lower face that lip fillers haven’t been able to achieve for them. The procedure involves an incision under the nose (usually discreetly located in the junction where the nostrils meet the upper lip). A small segment of skin is removed and the incision closed. The procedure results in a shorter distance between the lip and nose (this area of the face is called the philtrum), enhancing the cupid’s bow and helping the top lip roll outward more, making it appear larger and increasing the amount of pink (vermillion) lip showing. Results can be as subtle or dramatic as the patient wishes. In our clinics, lip lift surgery is also sometimes teamed with rhinoplasty, facelift surgery or chin augmentation surgery, to harmoniously rebalance facial features. Lip lift surgery is also known as philtrum shortening. It is a minor procedure, and can be performed under local or general anaesthesia. But it’s not for everyone; when patients are not carefully selected, the surgery can unbalance a face that already has good upper lip proportions. Lip lift also comes with risks and potential complications, such as prominent scarring, nerve damage, asymmetry and unnatural results that are difficult to conceal with...

Dr David Sharp before and after photos 2017 highlights

This is a small selection of our before and after photos from 2017! Thanks to all the lovely patients who permitted us to share their images this year, to help educate others about plastic surgery and the outcomes that can be achieved. Our patients come in all shapes, sizes and ages - and from the young to the mature aged, we believe it’s important to provide insight into the ‘real’ faces of plastic surgery; everyday patients! Despite the fact that much of what we see on social media probably reflects otherwise, the average plastic surgery patient is not a size 8 model with perfect breasts, a blogger’s body or celebrity with deep pockets; they’re everyday people investing in their health, wellbeing - and aligning how they look on the outside, with how they feel on the inside. This video provides an insight into the spectrum of procedures Dr Sharp performs every week. Happy New Year to all of our amazing patients, and thank you for making us part of your journey in 2017!...

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge 2017 Highlights

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge Aesthetic Surgery Symposium has been running for 37 years and brings together some of the world’s leading aesthetic plastic surgeons. This year, Dr Sharp and practice director Liz Washington joined hundreds of plastic surgeons and their clinic teams to learn more about the innovative techniques for facial and body rejuvenation. The program featured 94 instructive surgical videos, 26 presentations, 13 expert panels and 8 debates. Dr Sharp loves being abreast of the latest advancements in plastic and cosmetic surgery, and these forums provide a valuable opportunity to hear about the techniques, trials, anecdotal experiences and standards from across the world. The overall message from the symposium was: aesthetic surgery has changed, and the over-stretched, over-enhanced, over-done look is a thing of the past. Progressive surgeons are working together to develop new techniques to approach cosmetic surgery to achieve a more balanced, proportionate and natural look than ever before. We thought some of our patients may be curious to hear more about the ideas discussed, so in these videos, Liz briefly covers some of the symposium topics that often arise in our discussions with patients. Fat grafting Fat grafting has been used for reconstructive purposes for many decades, but its use for rejuvenation and enhancement is still a relatively new concept, and something that surgeons are still experimenting with to perfect and hone the right technique for different areas of the body. We saw some exciting results from the panel, and of particular interest was ‘micro’ and ‘nano’ fat grafting for facial rejuvenation, which is providing not just volume replacement, but also dermal rejuvenation. The faculty also addressed the...

Popular procedures for modern men

Men are more open to the options that aesthetic surgery and cosmetic medicine offer than ever before. And while women still comprise the majority of our patients, data from the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery indicates that the number of men having cosmetic procedures increased by more than 106% between 1997 and 2012; an ongoing trend echoed by the growing number of men seeking cosmetic improvements at our clinics. Often, male patients say they don’t like the tired, stressed or unhealthy appearance they see in the mirror - because they still feel young, strong and fit on the inside. Others are looking to freshen up their appearance before re-entering the dating scene. And many mention a desire to stay competitive in the workplace, linking their looks to their recruitment and promotion prospects - something noted by London economics Professor Daniel Hamermesh in his study of the financial benefits of aesthetic appearance. Here are some of the surgical and non-invasive treatments most commonly requested by men in our clinics: Rhinoplasty Nose jobs are a powerful way to change the entire dynamic of the face. Previous surgery, nose trauma or genetics can leave men with misshaped, prominent or irregular nasal characteristics. It can also cause breathing problems and snoring. Rhinoplasty surgery reshapes bone and cartilage, changing the underlying structure of the nose and creating functional improvements - such as improved breathing - while making aesthetic adjustments that improve its appearance and proportion with the rest of the face. The surgery requires about 7-10 days off work while bruising and swelling subsides. Dr Sharp’s patients receive a post treatment care pack that assists with accelerating...

What’s the difference between a neck lift and lower facelift?

One of the most common facial surgery questions we receive is “how do I know whether I need a neck lift - or a lower facelift?” Online forums and surgery websites provide conflicting information and terminology for these procedures; what they entail, and what they address for the ageing face - causing greater confusion. What is colloquially known as a ‘neck lift’ may not technically refer to the surgical procedure that this title traditionally entailed. The face and neck age together and for the most part a neck lift should include elevation of the lower face. Conversely a lower facelift should includes tightening of the neck. In modern times where facelift and neck lift surgery aims to be less invasive, the operation has been discussed as one of the same. The one exception is an isolated platysmaplasty which can tighten the mid line neck without having any effect on the face. When performed on its own it is used to improve a sagging neck in a young patient who has no other signs of facial ageing. What does a neck lift address? A neck lift - or lower rhytidectomy - aims to improve the signs of ageing in the neck and lower jawline area, including: Loose neck skin or ‘turkey wattle’ Excess skin in the lower face and jowls Excess fatty deposits under the chin Visible muscle bands running down the neck, which created abnormal contours Horizontal lines running across the neck Depending on your desired result, your neck lift surgery can be performed through a traditional complete neck lift incision, or a limited-incision neck lift. A limited-incision neck lift may involve...