In the media: Dr Sharp featured in breast lift guide

  Breast lift (or mastopexy) surgery can be confusing: it’s often mistaken for breast reduction surgery and it’s sometimes recommended alongside a breast augmentation to ensure optimal results. What makes you a candidate for breast lift surgery instead of breast reduction, and in what circumstances should you consider a mastopexy with your augmentation? Style Magazines’ recent breast lift feature addressed some of the misconceptions about mastopexy surgery, answering some commonly asked questions about this transformative procedure. Journalist Siobhan Taylor spoke to Dr Sharp about the surgical process - as well as the risks, recovery and what makes someone an ideal candidate for breast lift surgery: While the breast lift (or ‘mastopexy’ as your doctor would say) sounds simple enough, there’s a lot going on under the surface that you may not be aware of. In fact, the details of the surgery are significantly different from that of a standard boob job altering everything from your initial consultation right through to the end results. Because we want everyone to have the tools to make an informed decision, we decided to speak with Dr David Sharp, a highly-regarded Brisbane-based FRACS credentialed plastic surgeon, to learn more about breast lifts. Assisted by a team of clinical and administrative professionals, Dr Sharp is highly sought after for his expertise and down-to-earth approach. We asked him six of the most common questions our readers have about breast lifts. Read the full article here! Is breast lift surgery right for you? Get in touch with our patient care team and find out more... Name Email Address Contact number I'd like to know more about... 9...

Medicare plastic surgery changes: will they impact you?

Medicare has announced significant changes to plastic surgery item numbers on the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) that will be effective from the 1st of November 2018. If you do not have item numbers listed on your informed financial consent document, this news won’t impact your costs. This will impact rebates and health fund coverage for patients with certain item numbered procedures, so if you are having plastic surgery from the 1st of November onwards, it’s important to be aware of these changes and read on. What does this mean? Some MBS item numbers are being abolished altogether, while others will have a tighter eligibility criteria. If we have issued you with a quote that lists an item number, this quote is only valid for surgery performed up until the 31st of October 2018.
 Dr Sharp’s fees are not changing, but some rebates are, and so for surgery that’s planned from the 1st of November onwards, we will need to provide you with an updated quote based on the final version of the new Medicare item numbers. Which procedures are impacted? This list covers some popular procedures involved, and is not comprehensive: otoplasty: must be performed before the age of 18 or costs will increase by approximately $2,500 blepharoplasty: an optometrist or ophthalmologist will need to confirm that your excess eyelid skin obstructs your vision - if you don’t meet the criteria, costs may increase by approximately $2,500 breast reductions and lifts (mastopexy): in you don’t satisfy the criteria, costs will increase by approximately $3,000 - $6,500 (depending on inpatient stay) removal and replacement of breast implants: if you don’t satisfy the...

Breast augmentation question of the week: the difference between an augmentation mammoplasty and augmentation mastopexy

What’s the difference between a breast augmentation mammoplasty and breast augmentation mastopexy, or are they both the same thing (BAM)? I’ve been told I might need the mastopexy version with my implants. - patient Dr Sharp: A mastopexy is another word for a breast ‘lift’. A breast augmentation mastopexy is a combined breast enlargement and lifting procedure; it involves the placement of an implant to increase breast size and fill out the skin, while excess skin is removed and the nipple is lifted to sit higher on the new breast shape. Incisions are made around the nipple, with a single vertical incision down the middle of the lower breast, and in the inframammary fold. A breast augmentation mammoplasty, on the other hand, is commonly referred to as a ‘BAM’ involves the placement of an implant, normally using a single incision in the inframammary fold of each breast. Mastopexies can be performed on their own to lift a breast, or in combination with an augmentation to lift and enlarge. There are a few reasons why your surgeon may recommend a mastopexy with your augmentation. For some women, the position of their nipple and areola complex sits lower on their chest. This can be due to weight loss, genetics, breastfeeding or the natural ageing process. If the nipple and areola sits below the inframammary fold (see right), this is classified as ‘nipple ptosis’. There are various grades of ptosis. When seeking breast augmentation, it is often the case that an implant alone will not move the nipple upward enough so that it’s centered on the implant, forming a more pleasing shape. A mastopexy may...