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In the media: Dr David Sharp plastic surgery

Dr Sharp was featured in the QT this month, discussing the tips, trends and pitfalls of plastic surgery in 2019. He said more Australians are undergoing plastic surgery as taboos fall and surgical advancements evolve. Below are some excerpts from the interview with QT Editor Shannon Newley:   Why I chose a career in plastic surgery… The reason I chose plastic surgery as a sub-specialty is because I love performing the full spectrum of procedures it offers. They are all rewarding because they effect positive change in patients’ lives in different ways. For example, blepharoplasty surgery provides an instant reward because the recovery is so quick and it’s a small operation that makes a big change, whereas post pregnancy abdominoplasty and breast lift surgery is rewarding – even though the recovery is longer – because it restores core strength and improves back pain, pelvic floor issues and skin irritations after a woman has given so much of her body over to having a baby. Future trends in plastic and cosmetic surgery We will see more interest in minimal downtime surgery such as lip lifts, mini-facelifts and procedures that combine fat grafting. For skin condition and improvement, there is a growing interest in medical grade lasers, micro-needling and PRP therapy to help stimulate the skin’s own natural responses. It’s a more holistic approach than we’ve seen in the past, and I think it’s going to achieve more natural, sustainable results for patients. Current trends in plastic and cosmetic surgery The interest in having cosmetic surgery is definitely still on the rise. This is because the taboos that previously existed around...

Considering surgery in 2019? Here are four things to think about…

Great surgical results are the coming together of good preparation, great surgical skills, optimal post operative recovery, good health/nutrition and mental wellbeing. New rules that came into play in recent years ensured that patients and their surgeons can’t rush into cosmetic procedures - which is a good thing! Planning ahead, taking the time to get informed and ensuring that you have considered your recovery process, financial costs and surgical goals, helps set you up for the best possible outcome, and an enjoyable experience along the way. Here are some questions that our practice director, Liz, recommends patients ask themselves if they are considering surgery in 2019: What do I want to achieve? Ask yourself to articulate what you don’t like - and importantly - what you do like about your appearance. Think about the specific changes you’d like to see. Is there a certain look you definitely don’t want to achieve? And how do you expect having surgery will make you feel; both during and after the process? Consider whether you’ll be okay with the possibility that your results might be immediately visible (as is the case of breast augmentation) or could take a full year to reveal themselves, as rhinoplasty results can. Talk to a trusted person about your concerns or desires - and feel free to bring them along to the consultation with your surgeon; it might make you feel more comfortable, and can also help you remember what was discussed during your appointment! What is my ideal time frame for surgery? If you have your heart set on a specific time of year for your surgery, ideally, book your first consultation 4 - 6 months...

GOOD THINGS TAKE TIME

There are some inconvenient truths when it comes to plastic and cosmetic surgery that should be part of the decision making process when considering surgery. Behind the exciting before and after photos - and happy outcomes - there’s a massive amount of discipline, patience and consideration that goes into each procedure. Healing takes time. Scarring doesn’t always behave as we want it to; in each body it can evolve, change and mature differently. Recovery can be painful. Friends and family can be judgemental. Surgery can trigger anxiety. And if you are aiming for perfection, you will always be disappointed (in life, and in surgery). Some patients find it easy. We had a visit this week from one of our beautiful patients, who had undergone a breast reduction with Dr Sharp three months ago. She wanted to let us know she’d breezed through the entire process - felt great after surgery, bounced in for all of her post op appointments and patiently waited for her results to settle in. But the same procedure for another patient can be a difficult journey overwhelmed by anxiety and uncertainty - which is why it’s important to embark upon surgery with an open mind and an understanding that the process can be a marathon rather than a sprint. Over the years we’ve noticed some commonality between patients who enjoy the process of surgery, and the results they achieve in the end: They have reasonable expectations They have sensible expectations of how their body will heal and recover from surgery. If their bodies don’t behave exactly as they imagined it would after surgery, they nurture it and...

Dr David Sharp before and after photos 2017 highlights

This is a small selection of our before and after photos from 2017! Thanks to all the lovely patients who permitted us to share their images this year, to help educate others about plastic surgery and the outcomes that can be achieved. Our patients come in all shapes, sizes and ages - and from the young to the mature aged, we believe it’s important to provide insight into the ‘real’ faces of plastic surgery; everyday patients! Despite the fact that much of what we see on social media probably reflects otherwise, the average plastic surgery patient is not a size 8 model with perfect breasts, a blogger’s body or celebrity with deep pockets; they’re everyday people investing in their health, wellbeing - and aligning how they look on the outside, with how they feel on the inside. This video provides an insight into the spectrum of procedures Dr Sharp performs every week. Happy New Year to all of our amazing patients, and thank you for making us part of your journey in 2017!...

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge 2017 Highlights

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge Aesthetic Surgery Symposium has been running for 37 years and brings together some of the world’s leading aesthetic plastic surgeons. This year, Dr Sharp and practice director Liz Washington joined hundreds of plastic surgeons and their clinic teams to learn more about the innovative techniques for facial and body rejuvenation. The program featured 94 instructive surgical videos, 26 presentations, 13 expert panels and 8 debates. Dr Sharp loves being abreast of the latest advancements in plastic and cosmetic surgery, and these forums provide a valuable opportunity to hear about the techniques, trials, anecdotal experiences and standards from across the world. The overall message from the symposium was: aesthetic surgery has changed, and the over-stretched, over-enhanced, over-done look is a thing of the past. Progressive surgeons are working together to develop new techniques to approach cosmetic surgery to achieve a more balanced, proportionate and natural look than ever before. We thought some of our patients may be curious to hear more about the ideas discussed, so in these videos, Liz briefly covers some of the symposium topics that often arise in our discussions with patients. Fat grafting Fat grafting has been used for reconstructive purposes for many decades, but its use for rejuvenation and enhancement is still a relatively new concept, and something that surgeons are still experimenting with to perfect and hone the right technique for different areas of the body. We saw some exciting results from the panel, and of particular interest was ‘micro’ and ‘nano’ fat grafting for facial rejuvenation, which is providing not just volume replacement, but also dermal rejuvenation. The faculty also addressed the...

What is the dual plane technique for breast augmentation?

The dual plane technique is a form of subpectoral - or ‘under the muscle’ - breast implant placement. There are two main kinds of implant placement: Above the muscle, whereby the implant is completely above the muscle Under the muscle, whereby the implant is placed under the pectorals muscle, in varying degrees During a dual plane augmentation, the implant is placed under the pectoral muscle at the upper, and sometimes mid, part of the breast, but the lower part of the implant is not covered by the muscle. The varying different degrees of muscle coverage over the implant depends on the patient’s current breast shape and desired result, and that’s why it’s important to choose a surgeon that is experienced in this technique, as the ratio of muscle-covered implant to uncovered implant makes subtle adjustments that impact your result. The dual plane technique is a form of under-muscle augmentation, but that is not its only defining attribute. The ‘dual’ in ‘dual plane’ actually refers to the fact that the surgeon dissects (or cuts) a pocket out for the breast implant under the muscle, but also dissects off a portion of the breast tissue that’s connected to the muscle. So a dual plane augmentation involves dissection under the muscle, and above the muscle. Below: breast augmentation results using the dual plane method, performed by Dr David Sharp What happens during a dual plane augmentation? The surgery itself is very similar to a classic breast augmentation. Your surgeon will dissect a ‘pocket’ under the pectoral muscle, lifting the muscle off the chest wall and making space for the implant. Where it veers from...

Mums lead the way in cosmetic surgery

  Reported by Anna Hartley | 6th April | Queensland Times: SOME might be quick to assume young women would make up most cosmetic surgery candidates. According to Ipswich plastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr David Sharp, the majority of people who come to him for plastic surgery are in fact women in their 40s and 50s. The surgeon said the most common cosmetic procedures he performed were tummy tucks, breast reduction and augmentation surgery. “There is a large group of patients who have thought about having cosmetic surgery for years, usually females in their 40s or 50s who’ve had their children, who say, ‘I want to do something for myself now’.,” Dr Sharp said. “After skin cancer there is a lot of cosmetic stuff coming through and of that it’s mainly abdominoplasty, breast reductions, and breast augmentation.” Dr Sharp said his biggest concern when it came to cosmetic surgery was the trend of people choosing the “cheap” option. “The only people who are qualified to call themselves surgeons in Australia have to have a fellowship with the Royal Australian College of Surgeons,” he said. “My advice would be for cosmetic surgery candidates to really do their research. “I’ve heard some horror stories. The cheapest option is not necessarily the best.” Read the full article at The Queensland Times.  ...