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Considering surgery in 2019? Here are four things to think about…

Great surgical results are the coming together of good preparation, great surgical skills, optimal post operative recovery, good health/nutrition and mental wellbeing. New rules that came into play in recent years ensured that patients and their surgeons can’t rush into cosmetic procedures - which is a good thing! Planning ahead, taking the time to get informed and ensuring that you have considered your recovery process, financial costs and surgical goals, helps set you up for the best possible outcome, and an enjoyable experience along the way. Here are some questions that our practice director, Liz, recommends patients ask themselves if they are considering surgery in 2019: What do I want to achieve? Ask yourself to articulate what you don’t like - and importantly - what you do like about your appearance. Think about the specific changes you’d like to see. Is there a certain look you definitely don’t want to achieve? And how do you expect having surgery will make you feel; both during and after the process? Consider whether you’ll be okay with the possibility that your results might be immediately visible (as is the case of breast augmentation) or could take a full year to reveal themselves, as rhinoplasty results can. Talk to a trusted person about your concerns or desires - and feel free to bring them along to the consultation with your surgeon; it might make you feel more comfortable, and can also help you remember what was discussed during your appointment! What is my ideal time frame for surgery? If you have your heart set on a specific time of year for your surgery, ideally, book your first consultation 4 - 6 months...

2018 Highlights: before and after plastic surgery with Dr David Sharp

It’s been a big year of operating for us - and we love nothing more than to look back through our patients’ surgical journeys and see the improvements they’ve experienced! From facelift and blepharoplasty through to breast augmentation, abdominoplasty and wrinkle injections - here’s a small selection of results from the thousands of procedures that Dr Sharp performed during the past 12 months. We love being part of every patient’s surgical journey, and witnessing the positive life changes that self improvement can bring; which often reach far beyond the physical transformations seen here. Thank you to all of our patients, for entrusting your care to us - and making us part of your 2018. A special thank you to those patients who generously permitted us to share their results, to help educate others about procedures they might be considering. Keep an eye out for more on our Facebook and Instagram pages! Considering surgery in 2019? The best results are planned ahead! Contact us to take the first step... learn more...

How many liposuction procedures are performed around the world each year?

Liposuction is a commonly-requested procedure in our Brisbane and Ipswich clinics, with patients often pairing it with facelift, breast and abdominal surgery. Liposuction can also form part of gynaecomastia, gender confirmation and thigh lift procedures. Figures released by the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons in November 2018 show that 1,573,680 breast augmentations were performed internationally in 2017. Number of liposuction procedures performed annually - Annual Global Aesthetic Survey, ISAPS 2017 This makes liposuction the second most performed procedure in the world during 2017, closely behind breast augmentation surgery which was performed 1,677,320 times. Liposuction is suitable for people who have achieved their ideal weight and just have pockets of stubborn fat that don’t respond to diet or exercise. Commonly treated areas include the abdomen, flanks, under-bra area, upper arms and double chin. call to book a consultation with Dr Sharp   learn...

Question of the week: using liposuctioned fat for grafting

I want to have fat liposuctioned out of my thighs and stomach, and put into my breasts and face to fill out my sagging skin. Is it possible to do this instead of having a breast augmentation and facelift? - patient Dr Sharp: Patients also often ask if liposuctioned fat can be injected into other parts of the body, or ‘fat grafted’. The best way to explain my approach to liposuction and fat grafting is that liposuction is all about volume of fat, where as fat grafting is all about quality of fat! I often take small amounts of fat from the stomach or thighs and place these in the face to fill out areas that have experienced volume loss. Likewise, for slim women who lack fat across their chest to soften the appearance of their breast implants, I often graft small amounts of fat around the periphery of implants, to create a more natural look and reduce the visibility of implant rippling. Unfortunately it’s not an easy case of liposuctioning large amounts of stomach fat and using it to build breasts that are two cup sizes bigger. This is because liposuction technology aims to remove the maximum amount of fat with the least amount of physical damage to surrounding tissues. And the best way to do that is to break down the fat as much as possible before extracting it. This damages the fat cells and inhibits their ability to regrow when transplanted into another area; so it’s not considered to be ‘good quality’ harvested fat. One of the biggest downfalls of fat grafting is the fact that some...

Tummy tucks ease incontinence and back pain

Abdominoplasty surgery is far more than just a cosmetic procedure designed to remove a small post pregnancy pouch of skin. Most tummy tuck procedures reshape and strengthen the abdominal wall, reducing back pain and urinary incontinence after pregnancy. Earlier this year an Australian study found abdominoplasties provided significant functional and medical benefits to women post partum so… Why aren’t abdominoplasties considered a ‘medical’ procedure and subject to rebates after pregnancy? If you’ve lost 5 BMI points (outside of pregnancy) and have excess skin that can’t be conservatively managed, the Medicare Benefits Schedule criteria may deem you eligible for a ‘medical’ abdominoplasty - that is, one that is billed under an item number. However, since late 2015, if you’re a women experiencing rectus divarication, chronic back pain or urinary incontinence post partum, Medicare and health funds will consider the procedure to be ‘cosmetic’. So essentially, if a man undergoes extreme weight loss after bariatric surgery and has excess skin, some of his abdominoplasty costs will be reimbursed under Medicare (and private health insurance if he has an eligible policy), and yet a woman who has torn muscles, incontinence and back pain as a consequence of pregnancy cannot.   above: before and three months after abdominoplasty surgery with Dr Sharp Abdominoplasty repairs rectus diastasis (muscle separation after pregnancy), reconstructing the abdominal wall, removing hernias and restoring core strength - as well as removing excess skin from the lower abdomen. The authors of the 2018 Australian study highlighted the fact that this not only restores the abdomen’s shape, it can also improve core strength, and can impact back pain and pelvic floor control. The study...

What is rectus divarication?

Diastasis recti (also known as rectus divarication or abdominal separation) a gap (usually greater than 2.5cm) between the two sides of the rectus abdominis muscle. The distance between the right and left rectus abdominis muscles is created by the stretching of the linea alba, a connective collagen sheath (see right). In pregnant or postpartum women, the condition is caused by the stretching of the rectus abdominis by the growing uterus. It is more common in women who have had multiple pregnancies, but can occur after just one. Sometimes, the uterus can be seen bulging through the abdominal wall, beneath the skin. Women are more susceptible to develop diastasis recti when over the age of 35, high birth weight of child, multiple birth pregnancy, and multiple pregnancies. Abdominal muscles separation can appear as a ridge running down the midline of the abdomen; it becomes more obvious with straining and may disappear when the abdominal muscles are relaxed. In an abdominoplasty or tummy tuck, diastasis recti is corrected by creating a plication or folding of the linea alba and suturing together. This creates a tighter abdominal wall and restores the stomach to a flatter, more aesthetically pleasing appearance while most importantly restoring core strength, and often, pelvic floor integrity. Sometimes, hernias may also be present alongside abdominal wall weakness. In most cases, Dr Sharp’s abdominoplasty procedures include the repair of any hernias as well. To find out if you have muscle separation after pregnancy, speak to your GP. If this is causing back ache, urinary incontinence, poor core strength or difficulty with certain exercises, ask for a referral to a qualified plastic surgeon to...

GOOD THINGS TAKE TIME

There are some inconvenient truths when it comes to plastic and cosmetic surgery that should be part of the decision making process when considering surgery. Behind the exciting before and after photos - and happy outcomes - there’s a massive amount of discipline, patience and consideration that goes into each procedure. Healing takes time. Scarring doesn’t always behave as we want it to; in each body it can evolve, change and mature differently. Recovery can be painful. Friends and family can be judgemental. Surgery can trigger anxiety. And if you are aiming for perfection, you will always be disappointed (in life, and in surgery). Some patients find it easy. We had a visit this week from one of our beautiful patients, who had undergone a breast reduction with Dr Sharp three months ago. She wanted to let us know she’d breezed through the entire process - felt great after surgery, bounced in for all of her post op appointments and patiently waited for her results to settle in. But the same procedure for another patient can be a difficult journey overwhelmed by anxiety and uncertainty - which is why it’s important to embark upon surgery with an open mind and an understanding that the process can be a marathon rather than a sprint. Over the years we’ve noticed some commonality between patients who enjoy the process of surgery, and the results they achieve in the end: They have reasonable expectations They have sensible expectations of how their body will heal and recover from surgery. If their bodies don’t behave exactly as they imagined it would after surgery, they nurture it and...

Dr David Sharp before and after photos 2017 highlights

This is a small selection of our before and after photos from 2017! Thanks to all the lovely patients who permitted us to share their images this year, to help educate others about plastic surgery and the outcomes that can be achieved. Our patients come in all shapes, sizes and ages - and from the young to the mature aged, we believe it’s important to provide insight into the ‘real’ faces of plastic surgery; everyday patients! Despite the fact that much of what we see on social media probably reflects otherwise, the average plastic surgery patient is not a size 8 model with perfect breasts, a blogger’s body or celebrity with deep pockets; they’re everyday people investing in their health, wellbeing - and aligning how they look on the outside, with how they feel on the inside. This video provides an insight into the spectrum of procedures Dr Sharp performs every week. Happy New Year to all of our amazing patients, and thank you for making us part of your journey in 2017!...

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge 2017 Highlights

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge Aesthetic Surgery Symposium has been running for 37 years and brings together some of the world’s leading aesthetic plastic surgeons. This year, Dr Sharp and practice director Liz Washington joined hundreds of plastic surgeons and their clinic teams to learn more about the innovative techniques for facial and body rejuvenation. The program featured 94 instructive surgical videos, 26 presentations, 13 expert panels and 8 debates. Dr Sharp loves being abreast of the latest advancements in plastic and cosmetic surgery, and these forums provide a valuable opportunity to hear about the techniques, trials, anecdotal experiences and standards from across the world. The overall message from the symposium was: aesthetic surgery has changed, and the over-stretched, over-enhanced, over-done look is a thing of the past. Progressive surgeons are working together to develop new techniques to approach cosmetic surgery to achieve a more balanced, proportionate and natural look than ever before. We thought some of our patients may be curious to hear more about the ideas discussed, so in these videos, Liz briefly covers some of the symposium topics that often arise in our discussions with patients. Fat grafting Fat grafting has been used for reconstructive purposes for many decades, but its use for rejuvenation and enhancement is still a relatively new concept, and something that surgeons are still experimenting with to perfect and hone the right technique for different areas of the body. We saw some exciting results from the panel, and of particular interest was ‘micro’ and ‘nano’ fat grafting for facial rejuvenation, which is providing not just volume replacement, but also dermal rejuvenation. The faculty also addressed the...

Australia’s most popular cosmetic surgery procedures

The people over at Whatclinic.com have revealed the top procedures that Australians are requesting in their plastic surgeon’s office - according to the most common enquiries received by the clinic comparison website. The top 5 were: 1. Breast implants 2. Liposuction 3. Blepharoplasty (eyelid reduction) 4. Abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) 5. Rhinoplasty Breast implants are still the most highly sought after cosmetic procedure, while gynecomastia procedures - which remove male breast tissue - made it into the top 10, recording a 6% increase in popularity.   four of the favourites: before and after abdominoplasty, breast augmentation, rhinoplasty and liposuction with Dr Sharp What's on your list of most-wanted procedures? Name Email Address Contact number I'd like to know more about... Number Submit...

Post pregnancy tummy tuck: what you need to know

Pregnancy stretches the abdominal muscles and skin, often leaving a pouch like appearance where the muscle are permanently separated, lax and weakened. This is called rectus divarication and it can lead to secondary problems such as hernias, difficulty exercising, pelvic floor problems, incontinence, skin infections, core strength deficits and back pain. A reconstructive abdominoplasty resolves this by rejoining the separated muscles, repairing hernias and removing loose skin. Far from being only a cosmetic procedure, it can have a significant impact on a woman’s core strength, continence and self esteem after having babies. During this procedure, permanent stitches are used to pull the abdominal muscles together, restoring midsection support and creating a firmer abdomen. Sometimes the laxity of the lateral abdominal muscles (obliques) also requires permanent sutures to create an ideal shape; this is called muscle plication. Up until 2016, the Medical Benefits Scheme included post partum abdominoplasty, offering a rebate on the procedure where it was deemed medically necessary. However, after 45 years of being allocated an item number, the procedure was removed from the scheme in December 2015, meaning the 6,000 women who require this surgery each year would have to pay around $10,000 to have it performed. As reported in The Australian, the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) requested recommended against the removal, amid concerns over the life long repercussions women may experience if abdominal function is not restored. Currently, women requiring reconstructive abdominoplasty must access this surgery through a private plastic surgeon. The cost varies depending on the surgeon, anaesthetist, hospital facility and length of inpatient stay, but generally ranges from $9,000 to $12,000. Patients who require a post...
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