What is actinic or ‘solar’ keratosis?

An actinic keratosis (AK) is also known as a ‘solar’ keratosis. It has the appearance of a crusty, scaly growth and is caused by  damage to the skin from exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation; something we see a lot of in Queensland! Can it cause skin cancer? Actinic keratosis is considered a pre cancer because if  it’s left alone it may develop into a skin cancer, most often the second most common form of the disease, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). What causes solar keratosis? Sun exposure! Queensland has the dubious title of the ‘skin cancer capital of the world’, having the highest rates of skin cancer thanks to our high year-round UV levels, outdoor lifestyle and the predominance of people with light skin colour in our population. The most common type of precancerous skin lesion, actinic keratosis appear on skin that has been regularly exposed to the sun or artificial sources of UV light, such as tanning machines. Where does actinic keratosis form on the body? They most frequently appear on exposed areas such as the face and body, including the scalp, ears, shoulders, neck, arms and back of hands. They can also appear on the shin, ankles and feet. Which skin types are more likely to develop solar keratosis? People who have fair complexions are more prone to AKs than are people with medium or dark skin. What does solar keratosis look like? They are often elevated, rough in texture and resemble warts or scabs. They often become red, and can range in colour from  light or dark beige, white or pink. They can also change colour. In...

Popular procedures for modern men

Men are more open to the options that aesthetic surgery and cosmetic medicine offer than ever before. And while women still comprise the majority of our patients, data from the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery indicates that the number of men having cosmetic procedures increased by more than 106% between 1997 and 2012; an ongoing trend echoed by the growing number of men seeking cosmetic improvements at our clinics. Often, male patients say they don’t like the tired, stressed or unhealthy appearance they see in the mirror - because they still feel young, strong and fit on the inside. Others are looking to freshen up their appearance before re-entering the dating scene. And many mention a desire to stay competitive in the workplace, linking their looks to their recruitment and promotion prospects - something noted by London economics Professor Daniel Hamermesh in his study of the financial benefits of aesthetic appearance. Here are some of the surgical and non-invasive treatments most commonly requested by men in our clinics: Rhinoplasty Nose jobs are a powerful way to change the entire dynamic of the face. Previous surgery, nose trauma or genetics can leave men with misshaped, prominent or irregular nasal characteristics. It can also cause breathing problems and snoring. Rhinoplasty surgery reshapes bone and cartilage, changing the underlying structure of the nose and creating functional improvements - such as improved breathing - while making aesthetic adjustments that improve its appearance and proportion with the rest of the face. The surgery requires about 7-10 days off work while bruising and swelling subsides. Dr Sharp’s patients receive a post treatment care pack that assists with accelerating...

Mums lead the way in cosmetic surgery

  Reported by Anna Hartley | 6th April | Queensland Times: SOME might be quick to assume young women would make up most cosmetic surgery candidates. According to Ipswich plastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr David Sharp, the majority of people who come to him for plastic surgery are in fact women in their 40s and 50s. The surgeon said the most common cosmetic procedures he performed were tummy tucks, breast reduction and augmentation surgery. “There is a large group of patients who have thought about having cosmetic surgery for years, usually females in their 40s or 50s who’ve had their children, who say, ‘I want to do something for myself now’.,” Dr Sharp said. “After skin cancer there is a lot of cosmetic stuff coming through and of that it’s mainly abdominoplasty, breast reductions, and breast augmentation.” Dr Sharp said his biggest concern when it came to cosmetic surgery was the trend of people choosing the “cheap” option. “The only people who are qualified to call themselves surgeons in Australia have to have a fellowship with the Royal Australian College of Surgeons,” he said. “My advice would be for cosmetic surgery candidates to really do their research. “I’ve heard some horror stories. The cheapest option is not necessarily the best.” Read the full article at The Queensland Times.  ...