Dr David Sharp before and after photos 2017 highlights

This is a small selection of our before and after photos from 2017! Thanks to all the lovely patients who permitted us to share their images this year, to help educate others about plastic surgery and the outcomes that can be achieved. Our patients come in all shapes, sizes and ages - and from the young to the mature aged, we believe it’s important to provide insight into the ‘real’ faces of plastic surgery; everyday patients! Despite the fact that much of what we see on social media probably reflects otherwise, the average plastic surgery patient is not a size 8 model with perfect breasts, a blogger’s body or celebrity with deep pockets; they’re everyday people investing in their health, wellbeing - and aligning how they look on the outside, with how they feel on the inside. This video provides an insight into the spectrum of procedures Dr Sharp performs every week. Happy New Year to all of our amazing patients, and thank you for making us part of your journey in 2017!...

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge 2017 Highlights

The Aston Baker Cutting Edge Aesthetic Surgery Symposium has been running for 37 years and brings together some of the world’s leading aesthetic plastic surgeons. This year, Dr Sharp and practice director Liz Washington joined hundreds of plastic surgeons and their clinic teams to learn more about the innovative techniques for facial and body rejuvenation. The program featured 94 instructive surgical videos, 26 presentations, 13 expert panels and 8 debates. Dr Sharp loves being abreast of the latest advancements in plastic and cosmetic surgery, and these forums provide a valuable opportunity to hear about the techniques, trials, anecdotal experiences and standards from across the world. The overall message from the symposium was: aesthetic surgery has changed, and the over-stretched, over-enhanced, over-done look is a thing of the past. Progressive surgeons are working together to develop new techniques to approach cosmetic surgery to achieve a more balanced, proportionate and natural look than ever before. We thought some of our patients may be curious to hear more about the ideas discussed, so in these videos, Liz briefly covers some of the symposium topics that often arise in our discussions with patients. Fat grafting Fat grafting has been used for reconstructive purposes for many decades, but its use for rejuvenation and enhancement is still a relatively new concept, and something that surgeons are still experimenting with to perfect and hone the right technique for different areas of the body. We saw some exciting results from the panel, and of particular interest was ‘micro’ and ‘nano’ fat grafting for facial rejuvenation, which is providing not just volume replacement, but also dermal rejuvenation. The faculty also addressed the...

The Difference Between Saline and Silicone Breast Implants

Breast augmentation surgery increases the volume of the breast for women with naturally small breasts, as well as replacing depleted volume following breastfeeding or weight loss. It can also be used to change the breast shape for women who have developmental and chest wall deformities, such as tubular breasts or asymmetry. We often get asked about the difference between saline and silicone implants, and their risks and benefits. The ‘shell’ of a breast implant is made from an inert polymer called silicone; this can be either smooth or textured. Smooth walled implants move around subtly in the breast pocket, which means they can mimic the movement of a natural breast - and textured implants encourage soft tissue ingrowth into their small surface interstices, keeping the implant more stiffly in place. Breast implants have a variety of base widths, projection amounts and volumes (measure in ‘cc’). There’s no one size fits all approach to breast augmentation; the best implant for each breast is thoughtfully selected and matched to the corresponding space to achieve the specific goals for each patient; indeed, sometimes two different implants will be selected for one patient, as each breast can be different.   What are breast implants filled with? Silicone gel breast implants Silicone gel is an inert polymer with no known human allergies, sensitivities or reactions. Likened to the consistency of turkish delight or gummy bear sweets, the molecules are stuck to one another in a cohesive matrix. In comparison to saline, it flows differently within its shell and can often create a more natural look and feel to the breast, like breast tissue, while...

BIA-ALCL breast implant associated cancer update – August 2017

Breast implant associated-anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a very rare cancer that can be effectively treated, when detected early. Recent media reports may have caused confusion amongst women who have - or are considering getting - breast implants for augmentation or reconstruction. This post seeks to clarify what we know about BIA-ALCL. Last year 1.5 million implants were inserted worldwide. The number of people having breast implant surgery in Australia has risen by more than 1,000% since 2005, from approximately 4,000 per year - to over 40,000. More people have implants now than ever before, and so we would expect the number of people reporting complications now to be proportionally higher than what they were 5, 10 or 20 years ago. The TGA has been posting updated information about BIA-ALCL since 2011. As of August 2017, we haven’t seen one case of BIA-ALCL in our clinic, nor amongst our patients. What is BIA-ALCL? It is a cancer of lymphatic cells; a form of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (not breast cancer). What causes BIA-ALCL? Media focus has concentrated predominantly on implants, but there’s actually 4 unifying factors that contribute to an increased risk of BIA-ALCL: • Textured implants with a high surface area texture • Bacterial contamination at the time of surgery • Patient genetic predisposition • Time for the process to develop How long does BIA-ALCL take to develop? An average of 7-10 years after implant insertion. But women who have breast implants should regularly check their breasts for changes at any stage after breast augmentation surgery - most of all for actual breast cancer, which occurs in 1 in 8 women,...